Honoring Athletics and Quaker Values


A dozen years after their son graduated from Penn Charter, Scott and Sandy Adzick remain “ebullient about 1689.”

“I love Penn Charter,” said Scott Adzick, surgeon-in-chief at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, “and I believe in education and also the role of athletics in education.”

Scott’s father, Nick Adzick, taught American history for 42 years. “He was one of those iconic teachers that everyone loved,” Scott said.

In addition to teaching, Nick Adzick coached baseball at Clayton High School in Missouri for 27 years, following his professional baseball career with the St. Louis Cardinals organization. Scott himself played baseball for Harvard.

Mark Adzick OPC ’07, Scott’s son, continued the baseball tradition. Drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in his senior year at Penn Charter, he instead decided to attend and play baseball for Wake Forest University.

Scott knows the impact that strong athletics facilities and opportunities can have on a student. He and Sandy, an accomplished sailor who was the first female Collegiate All-American sailor while at Boston University, have supported the construction of Adzick Field, named for Scott’s father, in Clayton, Missouri.
 

Marghi Walters Adzick and Mark Adzick, both OPC ’07, pictured with 1-year-old Annie and Sandy and Scott Adzick.

And in gratitude to Penn Charter and Rick Mellor OPC ’69, Mark’s baseball coach since the time he played on the varsity team as an eighth grader, Scott and Sandy Adzick made a $100,000 gift to Penn Charter’s Palaia Field.

“Rick was a huge influence,” Scott said of Mark’s Penn Charter experience. “If sports were a metaphor for life, all the boys on the baseball team got it. He was just a great coach.”

As important a role as baseball has played in the Adzick family, Penn Charter is more than athletics to them.

“It’s the Quaker basis,” Scott said. “The charters. Consensus. Meeting for Worship. A diverse student body. Financial aid. Strong mind, strong body.”

When Pam Ball Hon. 1689 was teaching math at Penn Charter, Scott remembered, “she gave a wonderful analogy about what Penn Charter meant to her. She imagines 300-plus years of graduates coming out through the red doors—which signify welcome—emerging and crossing the threshold, and each turns and helps the next one.”

As a former Penn Charter parent, like Pam Ball, Scott wants to help hold the red doors open. A recipient of a Harvard National Scholarship that helped pay for both his college and medical school tuition, Adzick, along with his wife, Sandy, decided to double their initial gift. They endowed the Scott and Sandy Adzick Scholarship Fund to provide financial aid to deserving Upper School students.

Before Scott and Sandy Adzick made their gift, Mark and his wife, Marghi Walters Adzick, also OPC ’07, made their own gift to the How Far? campaign in honor of Coach Mellor, a staple of PC’s baseball program for 33 years.

Did Mark and Marghi’s gift influence his parents’?

“I think it did,” Scott said. “We were thinking about doing something ... and Mark got the ball rolling for sure—the baseball rolling.”

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